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Many Strong Voices Steering Committee Holds Meeting in Seychelles: SIDS and Arctic Working Together on Climate Change

People from the Arctic and Small Island Developing States (SIDS) have something in common – they are on the frontlines of climate change.

This common challenge is bringing people form as far away as Alaska, the Cook Islands and the Caribbean to the Seychelles this week to lay out plans on how they can work together to raise awareness about the threat they face. They are part of a growing global network called Many Strong Voices (MSV), an alliance of researchers, policy-makers, Indigenous Peoples Organisations, NGOs, community organisations and others in over 20 Arctic and SIDS states.

MSV was established in 2005 to promote the well being, security and sustainability of coastal communities in the Arctic and Small Island Developing States by bringing these regions together to take action on climate change mitigation and adaptation, and to tell their stories to the world.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s 2007 report identifies the SIDS and Arctic as being particularly vulnerable to climate change. For this reason, they are con-sidered critical testing grounds for the ideas and programmes that will strengthen the adaptive capacities of human societies confronting climate change.

Lessons learned through MSV will support policy development at local, regional and in-ternational levels. And they will provide decision-makers in the two regions with the knowledge to safeguard and strengthen vulnerable social, economic and natural sys-tems.

Delegates at the MSV Steering Committee meeting here will review the programme’s achievement and develop strategies for the next couple of years. MSV will be repre-sented at this year’s United Nation’s Climate Change Conference in Cancun, Mexico.

MSV is partners with the Sea Level Rise Foundation in the Seychelles. It is coordinated by two organizations based in Norway -- UNEP/GRID-Arendal and the Centre for Interna-tional Climate and Environmental Research in Oslo (CICERO).

For further information contact:
John Crump
John.crump@grida.no
+1 613 255 3840